UT Extension Publishes Resource for New or Beginning Farmers

“How to Talk Farming” Agriculture Dictionary Available Online

Beginning a new farming venture can be an intimidating move, but a resource from UT Extension hopes to ease the transition into agriculture for those new to the industry. Image courtesy Unsplash.

COLUMBIA, Tenn. – What’s the difference between a filly and a foal? What about tillage and no-till farming? What does “aquaponics” mean? These and many other questions are answered in a new publication from University of Tennessee Extension.

How to ‘Talk’ Farming: A Beginning Farmer’s Guide to Agriculture Words, Terms and Definitions (W 941) is a new publication developed to assist new and beginning farmers with terms and definitions used in the modern agriculture industry.

“Language is constantly changing, and that’s true in the field of agriculture as well,” states Troy Dugger, program coordinator for the UT Center for Profitable Agriculture in Columbia. “Farmers and producers who are new to agriculture or are just beginning in the field may struggle when they encounter unfamiliar terms. The goal of this publication is to decrease that possibility and introduce new terms in a digestible way.”

The publication contains approximately 200 terms and definitions from various agriculture sectors. Terms related to cattle production, small ruminants, horticulture, crop production and more are included. In addition to being a great resource for those new to farming, the publication may also be used by agriculture-focused educators across Tennessee.

“The list is certainly not exhaustive, and there are many words, terms and definitions used in agriculture that were not included. But the hope is that this document and the terms used in this guide will be a useful and valuable tool for those starting their agriculture endeavors,” adds Dugger.

To access the publication, visit utextension.tennessee.edu and click on Publications in the top menu. From the publications page, search for ‘talk farming.’ In addition to Dugger, the resource was compiled by Mitchell Mote, UT Extension Rutherford County; Andrew Griffith, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics; and Kevin Rose, UT Extension Giles County.

Through its land-grant mission of research, teaching and extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. utia.tennessee.edu.

About Brad Jones

Brad is the Owner/Operator of BBB TV 12, and has been with the company since August of 1996. Brad is a 1987 graduate of Coalfield High School and a 1995 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Communications. He won the 1995 broadcast production student of the year award. Brad worked at Shop at Home, Inc. a home shopping network that was located in Knoxville, TN from 1993 - 1995 and then at Via TV (RSTV, Inc.) from 1995 - 1996. After some freelance work in Nashville, Brad joined the BBB Communications staff in August of 1996. A short stint at WVLT TV as a news photographer was in 2001, but he continued to work at BBB TV as well. Brad is married to Nicole Jenkins Jones, a 1990 graduate of Oak Ridge High School, who works at Oak Ridge Gastroenterology and Associates in Oak Ridge. They have 3 kids, Trevor Bogard, 27, Chandler 22, and Naomi 13. On December 12, 2013 they welcomed their first grandchild, Carter Ryan Bogard. Brad is also the assistant boys basketball coach at Coalfield High School for the past 11 years. In 2013-14 the Yellow Jackets won their first district title since 1991 and just the 4th in school history.

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