TIMBER THEFT CASES REPORTED ACROSS TENNESSEE

NASHVILLE – Rising timber prices and the value of individual species have enticed thieves to steal timber across Tennessee. The Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA) urges forest landowners to be aware of timber theft and provides steps owners can take to protect their assets.

“Timber theft can be financially devastating to a landowner,” State Forester David Arnold said. “The value of the timber is not the only loss. In most cases, the thieves damage property and negatively impact conservation efforts and wildlife. We want Tennessee landowners to know what they can do to help protect their property against theft or accidental harvest.”

Steps to safeguard against timber theft include well-marked property boundaries and a plan of action for your property. Landowners without marked property lines can unintentionally invite timber theft when neighboring land is harvested. The plan of action is invaluable if you do not live on the property or if you plan to be away for an extended period. Your plan should include your name, how to contact you, and how to contact local law enforcement. Share your plan with neighbors so they can reach you if they see harvesting on your land.

A current timber inventory with estimated value is another helpful tool should any theft occur. Consulting foresters can help guide landowners on how to mark their property lines and how to mark trees prior to a timber sale. The Division of Forestry maintains a directory of private consulting foresters who specialize in timber inventory and in damage and trespass assessments at www.tn.gov/agriculture/forests/landowners/consulting-foresters.html.

“We’ve had reports of oak trees, poplar, and some hickory stolen in Middle and East Tennessee,” Agricultural Crime Unit Special Agent LaLonna Kuehn said. “One of the best ways to prevent this crime is to let your neighbors know if you will be removing timber from your property. If they haven’t heard from you and see harvesting, they should contact you or law enforcement immediately.”

Whether the timber theft is intentional or accidental, it is a crime and can carry civil penalties of double or triple the current market value of the timber. If you experience timber theft, report the crime to the Agricultural Crime Unit (ACU) via the online Farm Tracs form found here www.tn.gov/agriculture/consumers/ag-crime-unit.html or contact your local law enforcement.

ACU is a specialized unit dedicated to investigating and enforcing state laws and regulations related to agriculture, forestry, animal health, and agribusinesses. Visit the ACU’s webpage to learn more, www.tn.gov/agriculture/consumers/ag-crime-unit.

About Brad Jones

Brad is the Owner/Operator of BBB TV 12, and has been with the company since August of 1996. Brad is a 1987 graduate of Coalfield High School and a 1995 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Communications. He won the 1995 broadcast production student of the year award. Brad worked at Shop at Home, Inc. a home shopping network that was located in Knoxville, TN from 1993 - 1995 and then at Via TV (RSTV, Inc.) from 1995 - 1996. After some freelance work in Nashville, Brad joined the BBB Communications staff in August of 1996. A short stint at WVLT TV as a news photographer was in 2001, but he continued to work at BBB TV as well. Brad is married to Nicole Jenkins Jones, a 1990 graduate of Oak Ridge High School, who works at Oak Ridge Gastroenterology and Associates in Oak Ridge. They have 3 kids, Trevor Bogard, 27, Chandler 22, and Naomi 13. On December 12, 2013 they welcomed their first grandchild, Carter Ryan Bogard. Brad is also the assistant boys basketball coach at Coalfield High School for the past 11 years. In 2013-14 the Yellow Jackets won their first district title since 1991 and just the 4th in school history.

Check Also

Temporary closures on Spur and Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail on Thursday, September 29  

Great Smoky Mountains National Park maintenance crews will implement a temporary, single-lane closure on the …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: